Pest Control Blog

Why Do Pest Control in the Winter?

November 2nd, 2015 by niftyadmin in Minnesota

A frequent question that I am asked is ‘why is pest control necessary in the winter? I don’t see any active insects during the cold winters here in Minnesota’. This is a great question that I enjoy answering simply because it gives me the chance to educate and help paint a more complete picture about insects as survivalists, even when there are extreme temperatures outside. Consider the following:

  1. Lot’s of time, effort, and money can be invested to eliminate pest activity, as well as break up reproductive cycles during the spring, summer, and fall when one may perceive that is the most important time of the year to combat these unwanted critters. Taking your foot off the gas during the winter in an effort to save money will inevitably allow your home to be susceptible to a build-up of unwanted pests. You can easily loose much of the progress made over the past year by not treating during the cold months.
  2. Nature does not look at winter as time to kick up her feet and take a break until spring. Spiders, ants, cockroaches, bed bugs, fleas, rats, mice and more may slow down a bit in some cases, but they do not go away. The cooler fall weather will drive unwanted pests towards your home or business in search of a place to nest over the winter.
  3. Insects living inside the wall voids of your home are not affected by the cold temperatures outside. Inside they will nest and breed while waiting for the warmer weather of spring to arrive. Wall void treatments made during the winter will break up these reproductive cycles’ and eliminate or drastically reduce pest activity come spring time.
  4. Rodent activity is a year round issue. Not just with mice and rats, voles cause the majority of damage to lawns and bushes hidden below a layer of snow. This snow cover provides a safe place for voles away from predators which allows them to reproduce and multiply.

A good thing to keep in mind is that insects and rodents want a warm dry place to spend their winters just as much as we do. A big difference though is that while we may need a big open door to get inside, insects need a much much smaller one. More than likely you have no idea how they are getting in since it only takes the smallest of cracks and crevices for them to squeeze through.