Pest Control Blog

Does the frost kill off the insect populations?

October 5th, 2018 by Mike MacDonald in Pest Control Services

Most people think that when the first frost comes that they don’t have to worry about pests anymore, but does the frost kill off the insect populations or do you actually still need to worry about pests?

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Pest freeze tag

Now unfortunately, many pests can survive throughout the winter even when the frost hits. Several pests can actually go through a small freeze and simply thaw out a few days later and keep on going.

Mosquitoes, for example, will lay their eggs in standing water, and even if that water freezes, the eggs can survive after the winter. As temperatures warm back up, the eggs can hatch and survive just fine.

A light frost is just a warning for pests to find better shelter

While some pests may get taken out from a quick frost and freeze-over, for many, it’s just a warning sign to start looking for a better place to live. Unfortunately, most often that means your home.

This makes having your home treated before winter comes very important. This way, a pest control service like us at Rove Pest Control can create a barrier of product around your home before pests get in.

The major cause of pest issues in your home is from them being left unchecked and allowed to nest and breed. With a barrier of product in place this fall, you can rest assured that pests that go through it won’t last long in your home.

You might also be creating safe zones for pests and not know it. For example, if you haven’t trimmed your grass short before the end of the fall, you may be creating shelter for pests.

This longer grass can create a buffer zone where temperatures can remain reasonable for pests during a frost, and even after a snow fall. Piles of leaves are another protector of pests that create warmer zones for pests to survive during the frost and even throughout the winter months.

With hiding places like these, pests can survive much later into the season than they otherwise would. Many pests, such as ticks and wasps, also become more aggressive for finding hosts, food and shelter, so be aware that just because it’s cold or the frost has come, it doesn’t mean pests are gone.

Pests dig deep, when it gets cold

Another thing that a frost will do is signal pests to dig deep underground or seek out hiding places. Many pests either go into hibernation during the winter months, or still remain fully active, but hide deeper underground.

Ants, for example, often build caverns underground and seal the entry points to the outside world with stones or dirt. This prevents them from freezing in the tunnels below.

Other pests have been known to burrow into trees and under their bark to stay warm and hibernate during the winter. Some pests like moles burrow deep underground below the frost line, where other pests and food sources remain active.

In contrast to moles, it is common for voles such as the meadow vole to stay on the surface and pluck blades of grass to serve as an insulation lining to their tunneling through the snow. Keeping your grass short will minimize the amount of protection these pests can derive from your lawn and subsequently minimize the amount of damage done to the yard over the course of a winter.

Pests don’t like to go out without a fight, so be sure to limit their options and don’t just hope that a frost and some colder weather will take them out. In addition to that, set your home up with a barrier treatment to quickly get rid of those pests who do make their way into your home.

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